Review: the Fuze, a Raspberry Pi keyboard case and electronics kit

Back in the day of the board computers of the late 1970s – your Scrumpi, your Nascom 1, your UK-101 et al – it was customary to build a case for it out of wood. If you were a better equipped ‘constructor’ – what we used to call ‘makers’ in those far distant days – you’d build a box out of metal.

Folk like Tangerine offered optional cases, but most home micros made do with homemade jobs or nothing at all. Then along came the pre-knighthood Sir Clive Sinclair with his ZX80, and home micros all had to be clad in plastic from then on.

Fuze

The Fuze looks like an old-style home micro case.

Skip forward 30-odd years and history is repeating itself. The Raspberry Pi is a board computer just like those 1970s offerings, only more powerful, more compact and with better programming facilities than the machine code monitors of yore. Some people even make their own cases, though there’s no shortage of plastic off-the-shelf offerings.
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Upper-crust USB add-on for the Raspberry Pi: Pimoroni’s Pi Hub

Raspberry Pi accessory specialist Pimoroni reckons it has the answer to one of the tiny ARM-based computer’s signal limitations: too few USB ports for all the add-ons you might want to hook up to it at any one time.

Pi users have dealt with only having a pair of USB 2.0 ports – and there’s only one on the cheapest, the Model A Pi – by connecting a cheap USB hub. However, Pimoroni reckons most of the hubs users attach are not up to snuff: they’re not sufficiently powerful, being driven by a transformer pumping out no more than 1 or 2A, or deviate from the USB spec in ways that hinder their compatibility with the wee microcomputer.

Pimoroni's Pi Hub

Pimoroni’s Pi Hub: logo-tastic

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