Review: Pi-Supply Pi-Crust

I came across Pi-Supply’s Pi-Crust add-on board quite by chance, but it immediately caught my eye as quite possibly the most useful add-on for the Raspberry Pi there is. Having ordered one, received it and soldered all the parts together, I’m no longer sure that it is.

The notion behind the device is very sound indeed. It’s an internal breakout board that doesn’t merely replicate the Pi’s GPIO ports, it re-organises and labels them logically and clearly. It’s also intended to fit snuggly within the form-factor of the Pi itself. This is, frankly, a brilliant idea.


Pi-Crust on Pi: GPIO made really easy

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The Sinclair ZX81: a Raspberry Pi retro restyle – Part 2

Previously on ‘ZX81: a Raspberry Pi retro restyle’: I used a headerless Arduino Leonardo to connect a ZX81 microcomputer keyboard to a Raspberry Pi via USB, using code to handle normal, shifted and function-shifted key presses.

After some searching on eBay, I found an old ZX81 going cheap because it lacked cables, though when it arrived, I found the computer itself to be in excellent condition. Possibly it has never been used, though how if that were the case the cables were lost and the box got so tatty is a mystery I will probably never solve.

ZX keyboard controller

A new ZX keyboard connected to the USB controller – an Arduino Leonardo

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The Sinclair ZX81: a Raspberry Pi retro restyle – Part 1

I love the design of the Sinclair ZX81. It was never a great computer, even in 1981. It only had 1KB of on-board RAM, it was slow, it was small, it could only do black and white graphics, and it’s membrane keyboard was useless for fast typing. But it looked fantastic: black, sleek and totally futuristic. Almost all other 1980s microcomputers now look very dated. No surprise there, of course, but the ZX81 still looks amazing.

Hats off to Sinclair Research’s industrial designer, Rick Dickinson, for devising a design that is genuinely timeless.

The ZX81 membrane keyboard

The ZX81 keyboard hooked up to the Pi via USB and Arduino

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Practise what you preach

Some months back, I posted a guide to backing up a Raspberry Pi SD card using a Mac. I tested it at the time and it worked. It’ll be good to share this, I thought. So I did.

And a good job too, because this past weekend I needed to cook to my own recipe. A long overdue Pi sudo apt-get upgrade followed by tweaking raspi-config zapped my system software.

Pibow Raspberry Pi case

SD woes

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How to build your own Apple iBeacon… with a Raspberry Pi

US department store Macy’s recently said it is implementing iPhone-based tracking tech the better to encourage browsing punters to buy. Of course, Macy has chosen to pitch this as an Apple technology – figuring, presumably, iPhone owners are more receptive to inducements delivered through technology and have more cash to splash than Android fans.

But the fact is, the system Apple calls iBeacon simply makes use of features already part of the Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) spec.

This got me thinking: how difficult would it be to build a similar system of my own? Not very hard at all, it turns out. Choose the right kit and it can be quite cheap too. I created my beacon using a £30 Raspberry Pi and a £12 Bluetooth 4.0 USB dongle.

A Pi's UART pins, connected

Can this operate as an Apple iBeacon? Yes it can

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Review: the Fuze, a Raspberry Pi keyboard case and electronics kit

Back in the day of the board computers of the late 1970s – your Scrumpi, your Nascom 1, your UK-101 et al – it was customary to build a case for it out of wood. If you were a better equipped ‘constructor’ – what we used to call ‘makers’ in those far distant days – you’d build a box out of metal.

Folk like Tangerine offered optional cases, but most home micros made do with homemade jobs or nothing at all. Then along came the pre-knighthood Sir Clive Sinclair with his ZX80, and home micros all had to be clad in plastic from then on.


The Fuze looks like an old-style home micro case.

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Raspberry Pi Case Review 2: Cyntech and ModMyPi

A little while ago, I tried a pair of the early Raspberry Pi cases. Desiring a change, I fetched myself two more, one from British online retailer ModMyPi, the other from UK electronics firm Cyntech, which also worked with Pi specialist Pimoroni on the Pi Hub, reviewed here.

ModMyPi and Cyntech cases

The ModMyPi and Cyntech Raspberry Pi cases

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