Review: Pi-Supply Pi-Crust

I came across Pi-Supply’s Pi-Crust add-on board quite by chance, but it immediately caught my eye as quite possibly the most useful add-on for the Raspberry Pi there is. Having ordered one, received it and soldered all the parts together, I’m no longer sure that it is.

The notion behind the device is very sound indeed. It’s an internal breakout board that doesn’t merely replicate the Pi’s GPIO ports, it re-organises and labels them logically and clearly. It’s also intended to fit snuggly within the form-factor of the Pi itself. This is, frankly, a brilliant idea.

Pi-Crust

Pi-Crust on Pi: GPIO made really easy

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The Sinclair ZX81: a Raspberry Pi retro restyle – Part 1

I love the design of the Sinclair ZX81. It was never a great computer, even in 1981. It only had 1KB of on-board RAM, it was slow, it was small, it could only do black and white graphics, and it’s membrane keyboard was useless for fast typing. But it looked fantastic: black, sleek and totally futuristic. Almost all other 1980s microcomputers now look very dated. No surprise there, of course, but the ZX81 still looks amazing.

Hats off to Sinclair Research’s industrial designer, Rick Dickinson, for devising a design that is genuinely timeless.

The ZX81 membrane keyboard

The ZX81 keyboard hooked up to the Pi via USB and Arduino

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Review: the Fuze, a Raspberry Pi keyboard case and electronics kit

Back in the day of the board computers of the late 1970s – your Scrumpi, your Nascom 1, your UK-101 et al – it was customary to build a case for it out of wood. If you were a better equipped ‘constructor’ – what we used to call ‘makers’ in those far distant days – you’d build a box out of metal.

Folk like Tangerine offered optional cases, but most home micros made do with homemade jobs or nothing at all. Then along came the pre-knighthood Sir Clive Sinclair with his ZX80, and home micros all had to be clad in plastic from then on.

Fuze

The Fuze looks like an old-style home micro case.


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Raspberry Pi Thermal Printing: an update

Reader Daniel Boira recently asked me if I’d experimented with printing large characters on the SparkFun thermal printer (see Hacking a Thermal Till Printer…) that I’d rigged up to my Raspberry Pi’s GPIO. I hadn’t done so, so I thought I’d give it a try.

Printing double-size text

Print characters tall, wide, or tall and wide

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Hacking a thermal till printer to work with the Raspberry Pi

I’ve always had a soft spot for Sinclair’s ZX Printer. Yes it was slow and the print was poorly rendered on its special aluminium-coated paper, which picked up greasy fingerprints like they were going out of fashion, but it was cute, compact and cheap.

The Sinclair ZX Printer

A Sinclair ZX81 and the ZX Printer
Source: Carlos Pérez Ruiz

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